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Icelandic Magic and other types of Magic: Home

Icelandic Magic and other types of magic has Books and Webpages to explore this intriguing subject

Icelandic Magic


 

Cover Image from https://trove.nla.gov.au

Flowers, S, 2016, Icelandic Magic, the mystery and power of the Galdrabok grimoire, Rochester, Inner Tradtions.

During the Christianization of Europe in the Middle Ages, many books of magic were lost as the ancient pagan traditions were suppressed. But in Iceland the practice of recording magical spells in books continued in secret for centuries, on a scale not seen elsewhere. Now housed in the National Library in Reykjavík, these surviving grimoires, which represent only a hundredth of what was lost, reveal a rich magical tradition that continued to evolve into the 20th century. Drawing directly from the actual surviving Icelandic books of magic, Stephen Flowers presents a complete system of magic based on Icelandic lore and magical practices from the 16th century onward. He explores the history of magic in Iceland in pagan and early Christian times and reveals specific practical techniques and ritual templates that readers can adapt to their unique purposes. Flowers also presents an extensive catalog of actual spells and magical workings from the historical Icelandic books of magic. These examples provide ready-made forms for practical experimentation as well as an exemplary guide on how to create signs and symbols for more personalized magical work. The author also includes guidance on creating unique magical signs from the 100 mythic names of Odin, which he translates and interprets magically, and from Icelandic magical alphabets, symbols that connect Icelandic magic to the ancient runic tradition.

Summary from The Yarra Plenty Libraries’ Catalogue 

https://yprl.bibliocommons.com/item/show/735590027?active_tab=bib_info

About Author Stephen Flowers 38 works in 85 publications in 3 languages and 1,102 library holdings

http://www.worldcat.org/wcidentities/lccn-n86088357

This can be found at the Yarra Plenty Libraries

The Book Of Grimories

 

Cover image from https://trove.nla.gov.au

 

Lecouteux, C. 2013. The book of grimoires: the secret grammar of magic. Rochester, Vermont: Inner Traditions

 

An extensive study of ancient books of magic and the magical practices preserved in the few remaining grimoires. pt. One On the Magic of the Middle Ages -- 1.Names and Signatures -- 2.The Magical Characters of the Planets -- 3.Demons and Illnesses -- 4.Magical Healing -- 5.Remedies Taken from the Human Body -- 6.Love Magic -- 7.The Protection of Humans, Livestock, and Property -- 8.Magic Rings -- 9.Magic Operations -- 10.The Magic of Images -- 11.Orisons -- 12.Magic Alphabets -- pt. Two From Scholarly Magic to Folk Magic -- 13.The Romanus-Buchlein -- 14.The Doctor of the Poor -- 15.Extracts from Various Grimoires.

 

Summary and contents from Whitehorse libraries catalogue

https://wml.spydus.com/cgi-bin/spydus.exe/FULL/WPAC/BIBENQ/1593213/34478045,1

 

About author Claude Lecouteux 206 works in 734 publications in 8 languages and 7,032 library holdings

http://www.worldcat.org/wcidentities/lccn-n79052276

This resource can be located at Whitehorse Library. Ask at Yarra Plenty about their interlibrary loans https://www.yprl.vic.gov.au/?post_type=&s=interlibrary+loans

Magic

This is about different forms of Magic in a historical setting. The springing off point was a book called Icelandic Magic by Stephen Flowers. Further resources either expand on Icelandic Magic or give a resource about another type of historically based Magic, like Celtic Magic. Enjoy!